Conservative MP files for bankruptcy over unpaid taxes

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A Tory MP is facing insolvency procedures

Another blow to Boris Johnson’s ailing party comes in the form of a Tory MP facing bankruptcy proceedings for unpaid taxes.

HMRC has filed a bankruptcy petition at https://bankruptcyhq.com/state-laws/bankruptcy-texas-state-bankruptcy-courts/ against Adam Afriyie, who has represented Windsor since 2005, according to court records. Afriyie is identified as a “litigant in person,” implying that he will represent himself in court.

Sitting MPs who are declared bankrupt must resign under parliamentary rules if a bankruptcy restraining order is issued against them. If the bankrupt refuses to comply with the procedure or is accused of hiding assets, for example, these can be enforced. The prime minister’s party is already facing three byelections, so this would cause a stir.

Afriyie, 56, grew up on a council estate in Peckham, south London, but after creating IT firm Connect Support Services and then co-founding policy information firm DeHavilland, he established a reputation as a successful entrepreneur. The company, of which he held 72 percent, was sold to publishing giant Emap for £ 13 million shortly after his first election in 2005.

According to cadastral documents, he paid £ 4 million for a home in his Windsor constituency in 2008. It had an octagonal music room, an elegant spire, and eight bedrooms, according to estate agents at the time. In 2015, it was revealed that the mansion was being rented out on AirBnB for £ 1,950 per night. According to reviews, the apartment has been rented out at least eight times every year, implying that the listed amount has been paid at least £ 15,600.

Connect Support Services, on the other hand, filed for bankruptcy in 2017, and it was reported at the time that the company owed HMRC £1.7 million, which is the principal creditor in the future bankruptcy case. ‘Afriyie. It was first rumored that it might file for bankruptcy before the 2019 elections.

“The petition arises for various reasons linked to Adam’s former business activities,” an Afriyie spokeswoman said. Negotiations have been ongoing for several years, and the petition is currently being challenged in court as his counselors try to reach an agreement.

“Of course, I will pay any tax due,” Afriyie said, whose financial interests are listed as “nil” in the most recent register of MPs’ financial interests.

“We do not comment on identifying taxpayers,” a representative for HMRC stated.

Friends once suggested Afriyie as a potential leader, but he was behind a rebellious Tory scheme to compel David Cameron to conduct an EU referendum ahead of the 2015 election, claiming he couldn’t sleep at night if the public had no say in the subject before the vote. He was also allegedly involved in a plot to depose Cameron in 2013.

In the coming weeks, the Conservatives will face three byelections in safe Tory seats

Following his resignation amid outrage over his attempts to evade House of Commons suspension over a lobbying scandal, Owen Paterson’s constituency in North Shropshire is up for grabs.

With a majority of 22,949, North Shropshire is one of the safest seats in the country for the Conservatives. They are anticipated to retain the seat, but the election will be held before Christmas, since the Conservatives do not want the campaign to go on and allow opposition candidates to acquire traction.

The Old Bexley and Sidcup seat of former minister James Brokenshire, who died of cancer last month, is another by-election likely to be held in December. With a majority of 18,952, the seat is likewise regarded as extremely safe.

Out of respect for David Amess’ memory, opposition parties have stated they would not contest the by-election in Southend West, which was precipitated by his murder last month. After being found guilty of harassment, including threatening to use acid against a friend of a partner, a fourth by-election in Leicester East, the seat of former Labor MP Claudia Webbe, is possible. She intends to file an appeal.

If someone owes at least £ 5,000 in debt, creditors can ask a court to declare them bankrupt. The court order normally lasts a year, after which the person is “discharged,” meaning they are no longer responsible for the debts that were covered by the bankruptcy. Each month, between 800 and 1,500 persons in the UK are declared bankrupt, with many more undergoing Individual Voluntary Arrangements (IVAs).

Several previous members of the House of Commons have already been declared bankrupt

Several former MPs, including Neil Hamilton, a former Conservative MP who is now the leader of Ukip; Jane Griffiths, a deselected Labor MP; and former Labor MP Jim Devine, who was convicted of expenditure fraud, have already been declared bankrupt. In the past, Conservative Party members were accused of banding together in the 1990s to bail out a bankrupt member of Parliament in order to avoid losing their seat.

On November 9, 2021, this article was updated to clarify that the House of Commons rules do not prevent a bankrupt from remaining a Member of Parliament unless he or she is the subject of a bankruptcy restraining order or a debt relief restriction order (in England, Wales, or Northern Ireland), or their domain has been sequestered (in Scotland). This has been reflected in the title and text.

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